St. Mullins

The peaceful village of St. Mullins in South Carlow is situated on the River Barrow, nestling between the Blackstairs Mountains on one side and Brandon Hill on the other. The village is steeped in history, culture and tradition and has been associated with Fionn Mac Cumhail who gave the village its first name Rinn Ros Broc and later St. Brendan the Navigator.

The locality acquired its name from St. Moling, (614 – 696AD) who built a monastery here with the help of “Gobban Saor”, the legendary Irish builder. Throughout his life he performed many miracles, raising the dead, cleansing lepers giving sight to the blind and curing many diseases.

The complex includes a medieval church ruin, the base of a round tower and the former Church of Ireland church, built in 1811. A heritage centre now occupies the former church and provides a fascinating insight into the history and life of the area. The townsland has physical remains from many significant periods in Irish history – an early Christian monastic settlement, a Norman Motte and Bailey, a large graveyard with many insurgents from the 1798 Rebellion, nineteenth century flour and woollen mills and the river with its history in both fishing and canal boat transportation. The site has also been associated with St. Brendan the Navigator.

Tradition states however that the history of this place goes back a great deal further with associations to Fionn Mac Cumhail, the famous figure of Irish mythology who gave the village its first name Rinn Ros Broic. fionn is said to have stopped here to consolidate his followers on his way north to do battle and had a vision of angels while in St. Mullins, who foretold the setting up of the monastery four hundred years later.

ATTRACTIONS: Heritage centre displaying all aspects of local history including publications, church records, maps and old photographs while a most interesting tour of the settlement departs from here. Carrigleade Golf Course.

ACTIVITIES: Starting/finishing point of the Barrow Way, Carrigleade Golf Course and The Mullicháin Café.

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